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Press, Video & News about Mariinsky Ballet 
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Сообщение Mariinsky London Tour. Jul-Aug, 2011

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    Scotch Symphony/ In the Night/ Ballet Imperial, Mariinsky Ballet, Royal Opera House

    Written by Ismene Brown

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    Great Mariinsky ballerinas are a breed apart, even from Bolshoi women. They take the stage with a consciousness of entitlement that’s thrilling to watch, and when this almost sacred sense of mystique and grace instilled in St Petersburg comes with vivid expressive distinction too, then there really is nothing like it. Even if three American 20th-century ballets might not be thought the likeliest territory to make such discoveries, what a night for ballerinas last night was. Viktoria Terëshkina and Alina Somova are on their way to joining the peerless Uliana Lopatkina at the high table.

    Maybe it takes American choreography to reveal what’s most Russian in St Petersburg’s monastically trained ballerinas. Russian blood ran in the veins of the US master choreographer George Balanchine, two of whose works were on the bill, and who influenced his acolyte, the brilliant Jerome Robbins. Ever since the Mariinsky reclaimed the clipped spun-sugar aesthetic of the émigré ancestor Balanchine two decades ago, it has been their Balanchine that draws beady and expectant eyes. But last night the Robbins was the outstanding experience in an altogether distinguished evening of choreography.

    'You might instinctively check your own life in the mirrors the three hold up to love'

    In the Night, the centrepiece, is a romantic reverie under a star-strewn sky for three couples. It's what US balletomanes call a “piano ballet”, with long dresses, Chopin nocturnes, and love on the agenda - it can be as lavish or as stilted as its interpreters make it. For sure, there’s no other art form that so eagerly glorifies flaky emotional behaviour by women, but what succulent movement it inspires in the hands of a genius of theatre like Robbins when a woman can be played back and forth through dance like a yoyo.

    No three ballerinas could have been more deeply involved with potential emotional nuances and more finely poised in their dancing than Evgenia Obraztsova, Alina Somova and Uliana Lopatkina last night, their squires almost unimportant except as porters and devoted worshippers. Yet with quiet courtesy the well-bred Mariinsky men allowed the women to make of their relationships a trio of profoundly different stories, insights into the heart, each pair oblivious of the others except when at the end they almost bump into each other, come to their senses with a polite how-d’you-do, before whirling off again back to their fantasies.

    It’s Robbins’s genius that he fashioned steps for the three that are both generically similar and yet crucially different in signposting feeling. You might instinctively check your own life in the mirrors the three hold up to love: the first pair, meltingly intimate; the second, a bargain being fashioned between (as I read last night’s interpretation) a demurring younger woman and an older man; the third, a fractious, nervy belle in black hassling her partner, making for some acrobatic and amusing moments, moving to her heartrending apology with fluttering hands and a beseeching prostration, and his sweetly ironic reply, hoisting her high like a goddess to reassure her, and then unceremoniously dropping her into his arms for a cuddle.

    The petite, exquisite Obraztsova and the silkily tall Lopatkina have long ago proved their piercing sensitivity, so the greatest surprise to me was Somova, the young dancer whose extravagant tastelessness in some of her physical moves elsewhere has no outlet in this piece. Instead she showed a touching gravity and sense of potential tragedy with the dignified Evgeny Ivanchenko which turned the short but intense middle episode into the heart of the 25-minute ballet.

    The performance's directness was underpinned by the turbulently emotive piano-playing by Ludmila Sveshnikova, a small, surprisingly elderly woman, evidently vastly more to the Mariinsky than a mere rehearsal pianist.

    'Viktoria Terëshkina is a magisterial not-for-export Mariinsky ballerina of the finest distillation'

    Read more @ theartsdesk.com



06 авг 2011, 05:34
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Сообщение Mariinsky London Tour. Jul-Aug, 2011

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    Mariinsky Ballet: Swan Lake

    by Judith Mackrell

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    Singular and sublime ... Uliana Lopatkina and Daniil Korsuntsev in the Mariinsky Ballet's Swan Lake. Photograph: Robbie Jack/ Robbie Jack/Corbis

    When does a living treasure turn into a museum piece? It's a question at the heart of ballet, and especially at the heart of the Mariinsky's Swan Lake. I've always loved this staging, with its fairytale gothic designs and uncluttered stage. But now, in 2011, it seems strangely drained of life. The story-telling looks pallid and mechanical, and some of the dancers seem to be performing in an emotional vacuum.

    Or perhaps it's the spell cast over the stage by first cast ballerina, Uliana Lopatkina. Lopatkina is, beyond argument, both singular and sublime. Her exaggeratedly pliant limbs and grandly attenuated adagio are unmatched by any dancer on the planet. To many, her interpretation of Odette, a princess locked inside an enchanted tower, remains definitive.

    Certainly there are moments where Lopatkina's performance gives off the electric shock of genius, her eyes dark flashes of fear, her dancing a slow, exquisite resistance against the Prince's promise of freedom.

    But there are moments, too, when she retreats so far inside that tower of hers that the effect becomes impassive. Even dancing the black swan Odile, where she is all imperious challenge and sharp satire, Lopatkina lacks musical spontaneity, and remains strangely unresponsive to the dancers around her. Her partner, Daniil Korsuntsev, formerly accommodating Lopatkina's remoteness with his own lively expression, has lost his vitality. For the first time in my life I was pleased to see the Jester, normally a hyperactive pain, but here danced with a nice frisson of camp by Alexei Nedviga.

    And yet, this Swan Lake still remains a showcase for the Mariinsky's superb dancing: jumps high, neat and immaculately shaped, arms heartbreakingly expressive. The chorus of Swans, especially in their moments of collective, luminous stillness, remain the definition of a living work of art.

    GUARDIAN.CO.UK



06 авг 2011, 17:51
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Сообщение Mariinsky London Tour. Jul-Aug, 2011

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    Mariinsky Ballet: Don Quixote; Balanchine/Robbins triple bill – review

    Luke Jennings

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    Photograph: Tristram Kenton

    Last Tuesday the Mariinsky Ballet's two-day run of Don Quixote opened with Denis and Anastasia Matvienko in the lead roles of Basil and Kitri. The production, based on Alexander Gorsky's 1900 Bolshoi version, is pure Hispanic hokum, an orgy of snapping fans, swirling capes and drilling castanets. Toreadors strut in jewelled bolero jackets; street dancers whirl and stamp; smouldering-eyed Gypsies swoop into impossible back-bends.

    Excerpted from the Cervantes novel, the ballet sees the elderly Don (Petr Stasyunas) mistaking the innkeeper's Kitri for Dulcinea, his imaginary feminine ideal, and in the process helping her to outwit her father, who wants to marry her off to Gamache (Soslan Kulaev), a rich fop. She, however, loves Basil, a penniless barber and… well, you get the picture.

    The Matvienkos, husband and wife, are both from Ukraine and trained at the celebrated Kiev ballet school. He is laddish, flash, and in performance, engagingly shallow. She is less predictable. More than equal to the flirtatiousness and flick jetés of Act 1, she brings fragrant grace notes to the classical passages and a fine precision of line to the grand pas de deux. And if there is a slight sense of business as usual – this is very much the Matvienkos' showpiece – then it has to be said that business is good. Act 2 was a bumpier ride; Oxana Skoryk lacked elevation as the Queen of the Dryads, and the dream sequence failed to launch. But overall, cameo roles were strongly delivered, with Alexander Sergeyev a hawkish Espada, Ekaterina Kondaurova a superbly imperious street dancer, and petite Yana Selina a delectable flower-seller.

    On Thursday the company presented ballets by George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins. Not quite an all-American bill, because while Balanchine spent the last 50 years of his life in the US, and founded New York City Ballet, he was Russian-born and danced with the post-revolution Mariinsky. His Scotch Symphony, replete with misty ruins and ceremonial tartans and set to Mendelssohn, is less a tribute to Scotland itself than to the romantic ballets of 19th-century Paris, especially La Sylphide. The ghost of a story conceals dancing of rigorous exactitude, especially for the principal couple (Anastasia Matvienko and Alexander Sergeyev) who won well-deserved cheers.

    In the Night, by Robbins, is set to three Chopin nocturnes. The curtain rises on the night sky, before which three couples dance in sequence. The first pair (Yevgenia Obraztsova and Filipp Stepin) are sweetly rhapsodic. He lifts her, she seems to fly to the stars. Alina Somova and Yevgeny Ivanchenko are initially more formal, more circumspect, as if they have wandered out of a ballroom. But passion eventually finds its expression, in a sustained, trembling inverted lift. The third couple (Uliana Lopatkina and Daniil Korsuntsev) are overtly, theatrically emotional. He appears to reject her. She fights, twists, pleads, but cannot leave. Underlying all of this is an impression of ritual, of games played for mutual excitation, and to see the ineffably beautiful Lopatkina playing them is a dark pleasure indeed.

    Ballet Imperial, a plotless work set to Tchaikovsky's second piano concerto, is Balanchine's homage to the tsarist Mariinsky heritage. The corps de ballet are serene in their pink chiffon Karinska skirts, Vladimir Shklyarov is elegance itself and Viktoria Tereshkina swoops thrillingly between technical brilliance and icy self-regard. In all senses, a night to remember.



08 авг 2011, 14:50
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Сообщение Mariinsky London Tour. Jul-Aug, 2011

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    Scotch Symphony, Royal Opera House, London

    By Clement Crisp

    Impeccable dancing. Heart-lifting dancing. As the week ended, the Mariinsky Ballet staged a triple bill of works by Balanchine and Jerome Robbins, and made them sublimely their own. Over the past two decades, the company has reclaimed its Old Boy, Balanchine, whose Scotch Symphony and Ballet Imperial were on view, together with Jerome Robbins’s In The Night. St Petersburg schooling illuminated and enhanced these ballets, superlative classic style burnishing and naturalising choreography made for very different ensembles.

    Balanchine created his choreography for Mendelssohn’s symphony (shorn of its first movement) in 1952. It is “about” ballet’s Scotland, which is populated by sylphides and betartaned chaps. And it is a small and, I find, mysteriously beguiling marvel, like the 1830s Sylphide herself. The idea of an unattainable beloved (the sylph) haunts it, but so do tiny hints of comedy – poses reminiscent of group photographs; the heroine as apparition – while the dances speak of Scottish reels and their formations and, everywhere, of Mendelssohn’s Hibernia. I love the piece and adore the way the Mariinsky plays it. It needed a more subtle ballerina than Anastasia Matvienko to lure the fine Alexander Sergeyev to his balletic doom, but the clarity and elegance of the ensemble were tremendous.

    Words that hardly serve to describe a phenomenal performance of In the Night. Three couples, varied in their emotions. Chopin piano music. Love serene (Yevgenia Obraztsova and Filipp Stepin); love more mature (Alina Somova and Yevgeny Ivanchenko); love as anguish and final joy (Ulyana Lopatkina and Danila Korsuntsev). Flawless dancing, born of the music, alert to every possibility, to every emotional breath, exquisite in nuance, from each artist.

    The closing Ballet Imperial, created 70 years ago, is given in the pale shifts/no scenery manner that is how Balanchine finally shaped it for his own company. Heretically, I much prefer the opulent decorations made by Eugene Berman for the Royal Ballet production in 1950, with tutus and hints of the Winter Palace as setting. But this Mariinsky performance, led by the dazzling Viktoria Tereshkina and no less dazzling Vladimir Shklyarov, with a corps de ballet of radiant style and power, is commandingly good: the Winter Palace is gloriously there in the dancing of the entire cast.

    5 stars

    FT.COM



09 авг 2011, 02:58
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Сообщение Mariinsky London Tour. Jul-Aug, 2011

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    Don Quixote, Royal Opera House, London

    By Clement Crisp

    This production showcases the brightest of local colours and the dedication of the entire ensemble

    As a young man, Marius Petipa danced in Spain, and was not averse later to incorporating Spanish dances in his ballets. His sunniest statement is Don Quixote, more than tenuous in its relationship with Cervantes, but the jolliest exercise in Hispanic flummery and flaunted skirts – and all in the best possible taste.

    What we know today is Quixote at one or two or, more likely, three removes, various historic hands having been at work on the text, but the Mariinsky staging, as shown on Tuesday and Wednesday, is best fun, and because St Petersburg has always had an elegant way with national dances, given with most impeccable abandon. I love it for its academic sequences, shown with such grace of means, its brightest of local colours and its vivid energies.

    It was on Wednesday night that we saw an ideal Kitri in Yevgenia Obraztsova, so light, so charming, sparkling in dance as in character, adoring her world and her role, and making us adore her with infectious delight. Everything she did, step and drama, was diamond-bright, and she had a most promising Basil as partner. Alexei Timofeyev is young, boasts a big, brave technique that carves massive shapes in the air, and plays with a charming sincerity.

    A tremendous evening, and one further illuminated by Kondaurova as the noblest of dryads, by Sofia Gumerova as a street dancer, and by the dedication of the entire ensemble to this unlikely but irresistible romp. Bravo!

    5 stars

    FT.COM



10 авг 2011, 01:36
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Сообщение Mariinsky London Tour. Jul-Aug, 2011
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    Mariinsky in London: Balanchine & Robbins Dress Rehearsal

    US-based dance photographer Brian Mengini is currently in London, working on a photo project with dancers from English National Ballet and The Royal Ballet. Brian lives in Pennsylvania and often works with the Pennsylvania Ballet and Boston Ballet. He recently shared with us his experiences shooting the Boston Ballet in rehearsal.

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    More pictures @ The Ballet Bag



11 авг 2011, 15:43
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Сообщение SERGEY BEREZHNOY


13 авг 2011, 22:58
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Сообщение Mariinsky London Tour. Jul-Aug, 2011

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    Anna Karenina, Royal Opera House, London
    Balanchine / Robbins Triple Bill, Royal Opera House, London
    Swan Lake, Coliseum, London


    Reviewed by Clifford Bishop

    As befits a story that more or less starts and finishes in a railway station, Alexei Ratmansky's new Anna Karenina fairly rattles along.

    Large chunks of the novel are necessarily omitted – there is, sadly, no place for Levin's ruminations on the future of Russian agriculture – but so far as it deals with the relationship between Anna and Count Vronsky, the ballet could be used as clip notes.

    Telling so much in such a short space – Rodion Shchedrin's airless score, written in 1972 for wife Maya Plisetskaya's version of Anna Karenina, is only 85 minutes long – calls for all Ratmansky's considerable incisive wit. Major events gallop past, including the horse race where Anna believes Vronsky has been killed – almost subliminally suggested by a back-projection of thundering hooves and a group of spectators vacating their chairs so dancers can jeté across the stage behind them, like thoroughbreds leaping fences.

    The fluid switching of projections and props to make railway stations, trains, carriages, ballrooms and even bits of Venice will be familiar, if puzzling, to any follower of British provincial touring dance companies. It is as if those in charge of the Mariinsky's extraordinary legacy put their heads together in 2010 and wondered: "How can we be more like Northern Ballet Theatre?"

    Under the pressure of recording events, Ratmansky's dances are astute rather than truly penetrating. There is rarely the impression, which occurs so often in the book, of character being laid bare at a stroke. Only Islom Baimuradov's Karenin – a hand-wringing pharisee of judgment and self-deception – and Diana Vishneva as Anna become fully three dimensional. Vishneva's Anna, if anything, is more compelling than Tolstoy's; a transfigured, sensual saint who finds only mortification where she expected ecstasy, and in the end convinces herself that there is no difference.

    She has one duet with Yuri Smekalov's Vronsky, against a backdrop of trees in blossom, where Vishneva herself seems to open out, growing full and heavy with the possibility of happiness. Given what we know, it's heartbreaking, and if Ratmansky had found more time for moments like this he would have made a masterpiece.

    Coincidentally, the Mariinsky's Balanchine/Robbins Triple Bill, earlier in the week, contained an even more condensed sweep across the gamut of romantic love. Set to three Chopin nocturnes, Jerome Robbins's In the Night presents three couples at a ball. Although their steps are pure ballet, Yevgenia Obraztsova and Filipp Stepin are in spirit Maria and Tony from Robbins's West Side Story; bewitched by each other and floating on air. Alina Somova and Yevgeny Ivanchenko are an older couple with appearances to maintain, which they do nobly right up until the climactic lift where he upends her, and her foot trembles as uncontrollably as Odette's when she surrenders to Siegfried in Swan Lake – a revelation so intimate you want to look away, but can't. The same effect lasts throughout Uliana Lopatkina's and Daniil Korsuntsev's duet, as they tear apart and collide against each other, inflicting new scars because the old ones no longer throb enough.

    In contrast, Balanchine's closing Ballet Imperial had a frigid perfection: Viktoria Tereshkina's glittering ice princess declining to melt even as Vladimir Shklyarov's velvety, five-star-cognac partnering poured all over her. By then, Balanchine's misty-eyed treatment of Mendelssohn's Scottish Symphony was long-forgotten. Larded with tartan and hinting, with a touch of embarrassment, that at any moment it might become a jig, it journeyed too close for comfort to that well known Scottish landmark, the Brink of Twee.

    No danger of prissiness or of over-refinement with the Guangdong Acrobatic Troupe of China's Swan Lake. From the villain's first appearance, erupting like Alien from the guts of a giant swan, to the heroes' triumph, signified by Wu Zhengdan's princess standing on pointe, in arabesque, and slowly rotating on top of husband Wei Baohua's head, there are few signs of blushing understatement here. With a cast of contortionists, jugglers, synchronised frogs, transvestite cygnets, roller-skating swans and unicycling matadors, this is the world's most famous ballet as Lewis Carroll might have invented it after a few too many puffs on the caterpillar's pipe.

    INDEPENDENT.CO.UK



14 авг 2011, 19:20
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Сообщение Mariinsky London Tour. Jul-Aug, 2011

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    La Bayadère, Royal Opera House, London

    By Clement Crisp

    There are extraordinary evenings in the theatre when the spell of a performance, the power of an interpretation and a sense of undeniable spirituality revealed by the artists, make for a community of feeling and awareness between stage and public.

    On Thursday night, as the Mariinsky Ballet entered the closing days of its season, I – and, I’d venture, many of the audience – were profoundly moved by the last act of Petipa’s La Bayadère. It has been a treasure in the Petersburg repertory since 1877. The company dances this hallowed staging with a unique grace of means: it is theirs, and they show us how glorious it can be in the theatre.

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    Its last act, the sublime Shades sequence, proposes the ghosts of temple dancers appearing out of the night, and the hero, Solor, finding his beloved, Nikiya, now a shade, as she forgives him his betrayal of her love. The Mariinsky corps de ballet danced this with ineffable grace on Thursday, as always in my experience. We see the apotheosis of Petersburg’s classicism, given with an angelic assurance by dancers who move and perform as one: there is no more beautiful example of classic academic dance.

    Into this crystalline setting came Viktoria Tereshkina as the ghostly Nikiya and Vladimir Shklyarov as Solor. Both had danced with rare intelligence in the preceding acts. But in this Shades scene, the purity of Tereshkina’s style, the unfailing elegance of her technique, the purity of her line and the sheer brilliancy of her effects (daunting multiple pirouettes shown with an effortless delicacy, an intoxication of clarity that denied any sense of forced bravura) were phenomenal, and testimony to profound artistry. Here is a ballerina of beautiful gifts and I do not recall, after all these years, an interpretation more potent in spirit and style. Shklyarov, grand in feeling as in means, with gesture as commanding as his space-greedy elevation, with emotion superbly revealed, is a grand Solor.

    The sum effect was heart-lifting: these are dancers touched by greatness. And so this season, memorably fine, ends on this tremendous note. To the superlative corps de ballet, to the guardian teachers and coaches of these dancers, to Tereshkina and Shklyarov, to Victor and Lilian Hochhauser who make these seasons possible, profoundest gratitude.

    5 stars

    FT.COM



16 авг 2011, 06:22
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Сообщение Re: Press, Video & News about Mariinsky Ballet
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Anna Karenina, Royal Opera House, London

2 Stars

Reviewed by Zoë Anderson

Friday, 12 August 2011

Anna Karenina famously ends with a train. In the Mariinsky Ballet's new adaptation of Tolstoy's novel, you get trains all the way through. An elaborate carriage set looms through dry ice and clunks round on a revolve, all but elbowing its way to the front of the stage. It's a laborious effect that never looks as if it's going to work smoothly. Unfortunately, it sets the tone for the ballet.

Anna Karenina is the one new work in the Mariinsky's London season. It was created by Alexei Ratmansky, a choreographer who usually shows a gift for story ballets. His Anna Karenina falls very flat, scrambling through Tolstoy and trying to keep up with its music.

Rodion Shchedrin's score is full of lurching melodrama, short on melody and contrast. Though Ratmansky has streamlined the action, he doesn't do enough to establish his large cast as individual. These flurried dances are too rushed to develop character.

As Anna, Diana Vishneva has a wonderful moment when she believes her lover, Vronsky, has been hurt at the races. She rushes forward, pushing past the Emperor. It's a catastrophic social mistake – you can see that in Vishneva's wincing, please-let-the-ground-swallow-me exit. Then Ratmansky brings her back on for a duet with her husband, which waffles over the same point without making half the impact.

Mikael Melbye's costumes reproduce period styles in much lighter fabrics, letting the dancers move. His designs are dominated by video projections, moving the action swiftly between locations. The whirling images can be awkward, particularly when characters stare disapprovingly from the film screens.

Vishneva works heroically, giving Anna personality and presence as she moves from elegance to desperation. She makes the most of quiet, naturalistic moments, and hurls herself into the lifts and clutches of the duets.

Yuri Smekalov is a tall, bounding Vronsky, though he struggles to give the character much depth. Islom Baimuradov does too much artificial doddering as Anna's husband. The other characters are a hasty parade, whirling through court balls and social events. Playing Kitty, Yevgenia Obrztsova stands out for her buoyant personality and fluid lines.

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-enter ... 36160.html


Последний раз редактировалось Lena1975 18 авг 2011, 14:46, всего редактировалось 1 раз.



18 авг 2011, 08:50
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